Justin Martyr the Calvinist? (part 4)


Another quote, used to assert Justin held to unconditional election, is take from chapter 131 (link).

through whom we are called to the salvation prepared beforehand by the Father, are more faithful to God than you

Since there is no commentary or explanation as to why we are to assume Justin here holds to unconditional election, we will presume it is the phrase “called to the salvation prepared beforehand”. Of course, salvation being prepared beforehand is an assertion clearly made in Scripture (Acts 2:23, 3:18; Eph 1:4; 1 Peter 1:20).

So what does Justin mean by this phrase? Does he mean that God planned ahead of time that He would save a rebellious creation through the cross. Or does he mean that God planned whom he would save? And if the latter, does Justin mean that the individuals were conditionally chosen by foreseen faith? Or unconditionally chosen, while others were bypassed?

Consider what Justin wrote in chapter 43 of the First Apology regarding the fate of individuals and the role of free will. Notice that he strongly denies that the eternal destiny of an individual is “fated” nor necessary. It is foretold, not because of decrees or design, but because people act – both good and evil – out of their power to choose.

But lest some suppose, from what has been said by us, that we say that whatever happens, happens by a fatal necessity, because it is foretold as known beforehand, this too we explain. We have learned from the prophets, and we hold it to be true, that punishments, and chastisements, and good rewards, are rendered according to the merit of each man’s actions. Since if it be not so, but all things happen by fate, neither is anything at all in our own power. For if it be fated that this man, e.g., be good, and this other evil, neither is the former meritorious nor the latter to be blamed. And again, unless the human race have the power of avoiding evil and choosing good by free choice, they are not accountable for their actions, of whatever kind they be. (chapter 43)

and then the following:

But this we assert is inevitable fate, that they who choose the good have worthy rewards, and they who choose the opposite have their merited awards. For not like other things, as trees and quadrupeds, which cannot act by choice, did God make man: for neither would he be worthy of reward or praise did he not of himself choose the good, but were created for this end; nor, if he were evil, would he be worthy of punishment, not being evil of himself, but being able to be nothing else than what he was made.

It is hard to see how these statements could be squared up with the doctrines of grace?Far from being Calvinism in an “infant stage”, it would seem to be a straightforward rejection of the ideas found in TULIP.

We could continue to explore each of the citations that are used to suggest that Justin was a Calvinist. However, instead I will offer another assertion by Justin. This one, found in the Dialogue with Trypho, would be a denial of the “perseverance of the saints”. If Justin denies this idea, it would seem to be rather difficult to see how he would hold to the idea of unconditional election.

And I hold, further, that such as have confessed and known this man to be Christ, yet who have gone back from some cause to the legal dispensation, and have denied that this man is Christ, and have repented not before death, shall by no means be saved. … For the goodness and the loving-kindness of God, and His boundless riches, hold righteous and sinless the man who, as Ezekiel tells, repents of sins; and reckons sinful, unrighteous, and impious the man who fails away from piety and righteousness to unrighteousness and ungodliness. (chapter 47)

[<< Prev][Next >>]

What do you think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s