A Follower Waits…

It is National Poetry Month, so I thought I would explore what a follower of Jesus might feel on that day before the first Easter. It is done in the style of a villanelle.

Now begins the dreaded long wait
Wobbly my body starts to sway
Staring in angst at the locked gate

I try to be strong in this state
My trembling does my fear betray
Now begins the dreaded long wait

The guilt holds, it does not abate
My failures, against me, inveigh
Staring in angst at the locked gate

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An ethical dilemma in Hosea (part 7)

This is part of a series. I recommend starting with the first installment.

We started this series examining an ethical dilemma that was presented in the opening of the book of Hosea. Over several posts we explored numerous solutions that are offered by various commentators and scholars to handle the challenge. In the last post a solution was offered as the most likely, as it was the only one that seems to fit all of the available information. However, that solution requires us to accept an uncommon translation of Hosea 1:4 that is not used in modern translations.

Here are the two possible translations of the passage, with the more common one on top:

  • in just a little while I will punish the house of Jehu for the blood of Jezreel
  • in just a little while I will visit the bloodshed of Jezreel on the house of Jehu

A short overview of the second translation, which is required for the preferred solution to the dilemma, is offered in this post. It should be noted that I do not know Hebrew and am indebted to the work of other scholars in examining this solution.

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An ethical dilemma in Hosea (part 6)

This is part of a series. I recommend starting with the first installment.

We started this series examining an ethical dilemma that was posed in Hosea.

And the Lord said to him, “Call his name Jezreel, for in just a little while I will punish the house of Jehu for the blood of Jezreel, and I will put an end to the kingdom of the house of Israel. (Hosea 1:4)

When one first reads the passage, the dilemma is not obvious. It is only when we explore who Jehu is and what the blood of Jezreel might mean that we find a challenge. What we find is the possibility that God asked Jehu to perform an action, then praised and rewarded him for doing what was asked, only to then punish him for it?

That should be an unsettling image of God, who is often described as good (Ps 100:5; 107:1).

We have examined numerous options that are used to address the challenge.

Numerous scholars and commentators disagree on which of these solutions is the correct one. Each of these answers has significant weaknesses when one reads through the numerous passages that relate to the events. It is reasonable to conclude that all of these actions were part of what God expected out of Jehu and were commended. It is also rationale to accept Jehu as having the right motives while performing these actions.

So where does that leave us?

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